13 Good Substitutes for Star Anise | Collect from Kitchen

Star anise is a seasoning that is used in a variety of dishes. Despite, if you don’t have any star anise on hand, there are substitutes that you can use. 

Today, we will explore some of the substitutes for star anise. 

We will also discuss the flavor profile of each substitute and how it can be used in recipes. 

So, whether you’re looking for a substitute for star anise because you don’t have any on hand or because you want to add a new flavor to your recipes, we’ve got you covered!

What is star anise used for?

The star anise is used for many purposes. The unripe fruit forms the basis of the spicy Akkara (Malabar Tamarind), which is very useful in keeping the digestive system healthy. 

Star Anise is prepared by boiling ripe fruits in water and adding sugar or jaggery to it while boiling. All plant parts are utilized in preparing various medicines, especially cough syrups.

13 Equal Substitutes for Star Anise

We all must our beloved foods and drinks, but what if someone has an adverse reaction to the family (Fennel)? 

Simple
Simple

Luckily for them, we provide alternatives to Star Anise! These ingredients may not be as common or popular in everyday life – Thankfully, there are still ways around this problem.

1. ALLSPICE 

Allspice is a dried, unripened berry that is the dried fruit of a small evergreen tree. 

The taste of allspice is challenging to describe. Still, it has been described as a blend of cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg. 

allspice can be used in place of star anise in most recipes.

Allspice is used in sweet and savory dishes. Allspice can be used in place of star anise in most recipes.

Note- Use 1/2 teaspoon allspice instead of 1 teaspoon of Star anise.

One way to use allspice is to make a simple syrup. Combine one cup water, one cup sugar, and 1/2 teaspoon allspice in a saucepan over medium heat. 

Bring to a boil after stirring until the sugar is melted. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.

Add 1/2 tsp grated orange zest and steep for about 20 minutes if you choose to. 

Remove the allspice and other solids by straining into a fine-mesh strainer and pressing to extract as much fluid as possible.

Use sweet dishes that call for star anises, such as tiramisu or custards.

You can also use allspice to replace star anise in dishes outside of the sweet realm. For example, you might want to try using it in these recipes: Grilled Pork Tenderloin with Spicy Allspice Rub.

Read More- Best Salt Pork Substitutes

2. CHINESE FIVE-SPICE POWDER 

Chinese five-spice powder contains equal parts of cinnamon, star anise, fennel seeds, cloves, and Szechuan peppercorns.

if you can't find star anise, you can substitute Chinese five-spice powder. 

If you can’t find star anise, you can substitute Chinese five-spice powder. 

Note- Use 1/2 teaspoon of five-spice powder instead of 1 teaspoon of Star anise.

Five-spice powder is available at most supermarkets and Asian grocery stores.

Another option is to make your own five-spice powder by combining 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves, 1/4 teaspoon ground fennel seeds, 1/4 teaspoon ground star anise, and a pinch of Szechuan peppercorns.

No matter which substitutes you choose, the end result will be a delicious and fragrant spice blend that’s perfect for adding to savory dishes like stir-fries, braises, and roasts. Enjoy!

3. ANISE SEED 

The substitution of Anise seed for the Asian star anise is safe. 

Anise Seed is not a perfect substitute, but it can be used in most recipes that call for star anise at a small fraction of the amount – especially if you allow your dish to simmer long enough to extract its flavor and aroma. 

The taste and smell will not be exactly the same as star anise, but it will be close.

When looking for anise seed, try to find the whole seeds instead of ground anise. This is because ground anise can quickly lose its flavor. 

If you can’t find whole seeds, try to find anise powder instead. Anise powder will have a more potent flavor than the whole seeds or ground anise.

Note- Use 2 teaspoons of Anise seed instead of 1 teaspoon ground star anise. 

You might not know that these little seeds actually have some pretty neat uses! 

They’re great for adding flavor when mixed with meats like beef jerky- try using them on your next pizza pie filling, so you’re sure no one will be able to eat just half without getting hungry again soon after.–

Anise seeds taste wonderful by themselves sprinkled over bread before baking too, which means more healthy snacks later if nothing else does what everybody Enjoyed them enough

4. FENNEL SEEDS 

If you’re searching for a substitute for star anise, the seed of the Xylopia aromatica, or fennelwood tree, is a good option. 

Note- Use 1 teaspoon of fennel seed as an alternative to 1/2 teaspoon star anise.

Fennel seeds are used extensively in Chinese cuisine and have a similarly licorice-like flavor. 

Fennel seeds are available at most Asian grocery stores, or you can order them online. 

Fennel has a brighter flavor with less bitterness than some people object to when tasting star anise. In general, fennel is a good substitute for star anise in recipes like curries, stews, and braises. 

Fennel has a somewhat similar flavor to star anise, and it can be used in recipes that call for the latter spice.

5. CLOVES 

If you cannot find star anise, you can use clove as a substitute. Clove has a similar flavor to star anise and will work well in this recipe. 

Note- For 1 teaspoon star anise, use 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves in your preferable dish.

However, it is essential to note that clove is much more potent than star anise, so you may need to use less of it.

Clove is an excellent addition to any dish! You can take it in liquid, solid form, or even fragrance.

Clove is an excellent addition to meat, sauces, and drinks. It also adds an exciting flavor to dishes like curry or Ethiopian food!

Mildly spicy cloves are perfect for making homemade spice tea as well as adding some kick in your favorite cocktail recipe; 

Clove will not overpower anything while still letting you fully experience their taste through every sip of iced coffee on hot summer days when everything else feels too warm against the palate teeth. Clove can help cool things off after all!.

6. CARAWAY SEEDS 

Caraway seeds can be a suitable substitute in many recipes if you don’t have star anise on hand. 

Caraway has a similarly licorice-like flavor and can add depth of flavor to dishes. Try using it in place of star anise in stews, soups, or other slow-cooked dishes. 

Note- Use 1 teaspoon of caraway seeds alternative to 2 teaspoons of star anise.

You can also use caraway to flavor bread or other baked goods. Remember that light goes a long way, so start with a small amount and add more if necessary.

Even you can store caraway seeds in the fridge. They will stay fresh for up to 6 months when stored in an airtight container. 

Caraway seeds can also be frozen for up to a year. This is an excellent option if you plan on using them in large quantities.

7. ANISE EXTRACT 

If a recipe calls for star anise, you can use anise extract as a substitute. 

Note- Use 1/2 teaspoon of Anise extract replacement for 1 teaspoon of Star anise.

However, keep in mind that the flavor of anise extract is much stronger than that of star anise, so you may need to use less than the recipe calls for. 

Start by using 1/4 teaspoon of anise extract and adjust from there. 

8. TARRAGON 

Tarragon can be accepted as a substitute for star anise in recipes. However, the flavor will be different. 

Note- 1/2 teaspoon is enough to Substitute 1 teaspoon of star anise.

Tarragon is a bit more subtle than star anise, so you may need to use more of it to get the same flavor impact. Hope that helps!

9. CINNAMON 

Another alternative to star anise is cinnamon. Cinnamon has a sweet and warming flavor paired with winter spices like ginger, cloves, and nutmeg. 

Cinnamon would be used to flavor savory dishes as well. Like star anise, cinnamon is a source of antioxidants and has anti-inflammatory properties.

Cinnamon is available in both powder and stick form.

Note- 1 teaspoon is sufficient to give a similar taste to 1/2 teaspoon of star anise. 

The powder is a bit stronger in flavor than the sticks, so you may need to use less of it. 

When using cinnamon sticks, you can either grind them up in a spice grinder or crush them with a mortar and pestle.

If you’re looking for an easy way to add some flavor to your dishes, try using one of these alternatives instead of star anise. They are tasty additions to spice up your winter fare!

10. LICORICE ROOT 

Licorice root is a great alternative to star anise when making licorice tea. It has a sweet, earthy flavor similar to star anise, but it is not as strong. 

Licorice root also has several health benefits, including relief from digestive problems and coughs.

N0te- Calls for 1 teaspoon of star anise; use only 1/4 teaspoon of licorice.

Licorice root is available at most health food stores and Asian markets; try to get the organic kind since it’s related to anise. You wouldn’t want spraying with pesticides. 

If using licorice root, cut a few pieces, add them directly to your tea infuser or teapot, and leave them in while brewing. 

You can also steep for a little longer than you would with star anise since licorice root is a bit milder.

Give licorice tea a try the next time you’re looking for something different!

11. SAMBUCA 

If you are looking to make sambuca that tastes like star anise, you will want to use a fraction of the amount of sambuca.

Note- A teaspoon of star anise would be equivalent to a tablespoon of sambuca. 

Sambuca is a flavored, anise-flavored liqueur usually served as a post-dinner drink. It was initially made by the Italian firm Sambuca Romana. 

The best part of sambuca is its sweet licorice flavor from its principal ingredient, star anise. 

This unique and robust taste was always well received by the public. Still, sambuca is traditionally served with three coffee beans on top of it, each representing health, happiness, and prosperity.

12. GROUND CLOVE & CASSIA BARK POWDER

Mix both together along with salt and sugar; it is even tastier!

You can also make a nice loaf out of it by putting all ingredients in a bread maker. But don’t put the glutinous rice powder as there isn’t any instruction for that.

You can also use a steamer to steam the buns or put them inside an ovenproof bowl with water on the bottom and cover with another bowl over. 

Steam for 20 minutes until cooked. Then turn onto a plate and steam for another 15 minutes before removing from the bowl. The buns will be very soft and fluffy.

13. CHERVIL 

Interestingly, some people use Chervil in place of Star Anise when preparing this dish. 

Chervil has a much milder flavor than Star Anise, and some people believe that it pairs better with the other flavors in the recipe. 

Note- Use 1 teaspoon of Chervil substitute for 1/2 teaspoon of star anise.

If you want to try something unusual, or if you cannot find star anise in your area, try using Chervil instead.

If you are getting sick of the taste of your Instant Pot, this is an excellent recipe to try. It is very simple and has several different uses if you need something quick in a pinch.

Cooking some beef tenderloin on the stovetop while still cooking rice or quinoa for dinner is a great way to save time and energy.

More Alternative- What Do You Use While don’t Have Ginger-Garlic Paste?

Wrap Up On- Star Anise Substitute

Your new go-to recipe for a Moroccan spice blend is here. It’s time to get creative with your cooking and dish up some delicious food that will be perfect for cold winter nights or can help you beat the heat of summer. 

This versatile seasoning mix will have you feeling like a professional chef in no time!

FAQS Relates to Star Anise Alternatives

Q1. What does anise taste like?

Anise has a sweet, licorice-like solid aroma and flavor. The seeds are used to flavor alcohols such as pastis, ouzo, sambuca, raki, and mastika. 

In addition to being used in alcoholic beverages, it is also a popular spice for use in preparing sausages and is a common ingredient in Pernod. 

Q2. Is star anise the same as licorice?

No, star anise is not the same as licorice. Licorice is a sweet, chewy candy that is flavored with anise oil. 

Star anise is a spice with a similar flavor to licorice, but it is not as sweet. Star anise is often used in recipes for Chinese food and some curries.

Q3. Where do I find star anise?

Star anise can be seen in the spice aisle of most grocery stores. It is typically sold in small plastic containers and is marked with an orange label. 

If you cannot find star anise at your local store, you can also purchase it online.

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